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How to Make a Rice Salad

How to Make a Rice Salad There are many types of rice salad. In general, rice salad has a thin dressing, rice, and vegetables combined. You may have something simple like white rice, cucumbers, and vinaigrette, or you can have something more complex with sun-dried tomatoes, walnuts, papaya and feta cheese. You can combine almost anything together in a rice salad that you want. Wild rice is also used to make tasty salads, often combined with meat of some kind, sweet grapes, nuts and a light dressing. Rice salads can be made ahead of time, but reserve most of the dressing until just before serving so the rice does not get mushy. This recipe is a little different. It uses sweet rice, also known as sushi rice. You can find it in Asian markets. Sushi rice is sticky when it is cooked and it has a slightly sweet flavor. The rest of the ingredients are commonly used in sushi dishes. The entire salad has a wonderful Japanese flavor. If you like sushi, this salad will be a hit. It makes a wonderful lunch or even a light dinner. Alternatively, you can use it as a side dish. Recipe for Sushi Rice Salad This unique twist on rice salad will be an instant hit. What You Need 1/2 cup short grain sushi rice 3/4 cup plus 1-1/2 Tablespoons water 1/4 cup seasoned rice vinegar 1 Tablespoon sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1 medium carrot 1-1/4 teaspoons wasabi paste 1-1/2 Tablespoons vegetable oil 1/2 large seedless cucumber, peeled, halved, cored and chopped 3 scallions, thinly sliced on the diagonal 3 Tablespoons Japanese pickled ginger, drained, sliced and coarsely chopped 1 Tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted 1 avocado 8 fresh shiso leaves (optional) 1 (6 inch) square toasted nori, cut into thin strips with scissors How to Make It Rinse the rice in several changes of cold water until the water runs clear. Drain in a colander for 30 minutes. Place rice and 1-3/4 cups of water in a saucepan and bring it to a boil. Cover and simmer for two minutes. Remove the rice from the heat and let it stand, covered, for 10 minutes. Do not lift the lid. While the rice finishes, bring the vinegar, sugar, and salt just to a boil in a very small saucepan. Stir it constantly until the sugar dissolves completely. Let it cool 2 minutes. Spread the rice in a large shallow pan. Sprinkle it with the vinegar mixture and toss it with a wooden spoon. Using a vegetable peeler, shave thin lengths from the carrot. Cut the slices diagonally into strips 1/4 inch wide. Whisk the wasabi, the remaining 1-1/2 tablespoons of water, and oil together in a bowl. Add the rice, carrot, cucumber, ginger, scallions, and sesame seeds. Toss gently. Cut the avocado in half, remove the pit, and peel it. Cut crosswise into slices 1/4 inch thick. Arrange 2 shiso leaves (if you are using them) on each of 4 plates. Top with the avocado and rice mixture and sprinkle with nori strips. Serves 4.…

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Making Homemade Sushi – How to Make Makizushi (Rolled Sushi)

Making Homemade Sushi – How to Make Makizushi (Rolled Sushi) Makizushi is the stereotypical “sushi roll” that everyone always pictures when they thing of sushi. It is a round disc, about an inch and a half to two inches in diameter, with fillings in the center surrounded by rice and wrapped in a thin sheet of dark green dried seaweed. This is one of my absolute favorite ways to eat sushi, with a wide variety of flavors, textures and ingredients that can be used. It’s also very easy to improvise and make up something of your own, even if traditional sushi chefs would turn over in their graves if they could see it. Makizushi is very easy to make yourself at home, which saves you money and makes a sushi habit much more accessible in general. Here are the basic steps to making makizushi. Step 1 – Prepare the Rice I won’t go into this step in depth, because the correct technique for preparing sushi rice is another article in itself. If you don’t know the procedure I’ve written a separate article that covers it, or you can look it up via Google or Yahoo. Step 2 – Ready the Ingredients This is personal preference, but I like to cut up any vegetables and fish I’ll be using in my sushi rolls beforehand so I don’t have to stop once I get in the zone. This also includes taking lids off sauces and preparing tezu (vinegared water.) Step 3 – Line the Nori Nori will often have a shiny finish on one side and a matte finish on the other – make sure the shiny side is down. Moisten your hands with tezu then grab a heaping handful of rice and plop it in the middle of the nori. Spread it gently with your fingertips to cover the entire sheet except for about an inch at the top. The grains should not be mushed or packed down, and should have a “loose” look to them. Step 4 – Add the Ingredients I personally like to make a thin finger-width trench in the approximate middle of the sheet, by gently pushing the rice aside until there’s only a 1-grain deep layer, which I then spread lightly with a smear of wasabi paste. This is not strictly necessary, it’s just what I do. Either way, you’ll still layer your ingredients in parallel rows in the middle of the nori. Step 5 – Roll the Roll (Note that the follow procedure is only if you’re not using a makisu; if you are then just roll it up and press lightly to seal.) Dry your hands and moisten your fingertips only with tezu. Gently place your thumbs underneath the bottom of the nori near the center while simultaneously lifting and rolling away from you. Make sure to hold the ingredients in with your fingers while you roll. Once you’ve completed one revolution everything should stay together; continue rolling until you’ve sealed the bottom of the nori with the open space on top, and that the seam is located on the bottom. And that’s basically all there is to it. An additional tip is to refrigerate the rolls for fifteen or twenty minutes after you roll them and before you cut them into pieces. And remember, cut the roll in half and cut each half into three pieces — fourths is bad luck!…