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The Best Meals I Have Been Privileged to Eat

The Best Meals I Have Been Privileged to Eat New York has some of the best restaurants in the world and over the past few years, I have made it a goal of mine to eat at as many of them as possible. It has been no easy task, but I think I have made a solid dent. While it hurts me to think about how much money I have spent on food living in New York, some of the meals I have had will stay with me forever. The first truly great meal I had in New York was at the legendary Gotham Restaurant. If you’ve ever seen or read American Psycho, then think of this restaurant as Dorsia. If you have no idea what I’m talking about, then all you must know is this restaurant is a New York staple and could pass as the definition for fine dining. Sushi Yasuda is the best sushi that can be had in New York. I can safely say this after visiting all the top sushi spots. Go for lunch and get the $38 price fixe, which will give you enough fish to agree with me. If you are looking for adventure or romance, Blue Hill at Stone Barns is the answer. Located about 30 minutes outside of the city, Dan Barber’s farm-to-table masterpiece resides on a farm from which all the dishes are prepared. It redefines freshness. As of today, Le Bernardin is the best meal I have ever experienced. A friend and I went and did the 9 course chef’s tasting, which is a seafood masterpiece. Everything we had was incredible, with the standout being the truffled Langostine. But what will be my favorite meal three weeks from now? I only question this because I am going to Per Se. I had to make this reservation over 2 months ago and have been anticipating this meal ever since. A lot of hype to live up to, but I am confident that Thomas Keller’s staff will not let me down. Il Mulino is an old-world Italian restaurant that transports you to a living room. You better come hungry, and don’t fill up on the bread!…

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Making Sushi Class – Learn How to Make Sushi at Home

Making Sushi Class – Learn How to Make Sushi at Home Sushi is a food that is eaten worldwide in both casual and formal settings. If you don’t have the ability or experience to eat sushi in a high class or formal experience you can make your own sushi at home and it can taste just as good as when the chefs make it. First you must understand exactly what sushi is. The basic form of sushi is that it is a roll of fish or other sea food wrapped up with rice. These ingredients are placed inside of seaweed, also known as nori. There are two different types of sushi as a base. The first is simpler and is hosomaki which is translated as thin maki. This type of sushi only contains one type of filling which can be fish, seafood, or just a simple vegetable for those who don’t eat any type of fish and/or seafood. The second type is futomaki also known as fat maki and this contains two or more fillings for a fuller type of sushi. These two are the basics for sushi making. They can be spiced up by adding additional sauces or seasonings. Sushi can also be rolled or folded in different ways. Hand formed sushi, also known as nigri sushi, is the most common type and includes pressed rice along with some type of topping. Another type is known as maki sushi and is rolled up. The seaweed is wrapped around rice and a filling. It may be hosomaki or futomaki. In order to make sushi a few basic ingredients are required. Nori, short grained rice, seasonings, and a type of raw fish or vegetable are the basic essentials. The vegetables may include but are not limited to avocado, cucumber, carrots, and asparagus. The seasonings can be plants and other items such as ginger root, wasabi, or soy sauce. If you want to include seafood you may want to include shrimp, eel, salmon, or any other seafood. Now that we have outlined ingredients the actual process of making the sushi can occur. Place nori down flat on a bamboo mat for the filling to be placed inside. Spread a very thin layer of rice on top of the nori that leaves enough visible for the nori to be seen. Any ingredients you wish to be placed inside the sushi are now placed in the middle of the nori. Now it is time to roll the sushi. Hold the bamboo mat edge and roll away from you. Be sure that the roll is tight but not tight enough that the fillings seep out of the edges. After the roll is complete the bamboo can be separated and the roll is left intact. The entire sushi roll is now ready to be sliced into sections. Depending upon the size you want each roll to be, now cut it into either sections of six or eight. Don’t be afraid to experiment and try different ingredients and combinations. You never know what kind of creation you will come up with.…

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Making Homemade Sushi – Futomako Vs Hosomaki (Fat Rolls Vs Thin Rolls)

Making Homemade Sushi – Futomako Vs Hosomaki (Fat Rolls Vs Thin Rolls) Making sushi at home can be a fun and interesting learning experience. I’ve written several other articles describing the different ingredients and tools that you need to get started, so now I’m going to explain some the techniques used to construct the individual types of sushi. One of the most common forms of sushi is known as makizushi, or “rolled sushi.” This is the item most commonly pictured as the archetypal representation of sushi: a variety of “fillings” such as crab meat, raw fish and vegetables, rolled up in a blanket or rice and seaweed and cut into bite-sized disks. There are actually two forms of makizushi: hosomaki and futomaki. Fat Rolls The futomaki or “fat rolls” are predictably enough of the larger of the two, containing several different fillings. These are the makizushi options most typically seen on the menus at sushi bars, such as spicy tuna, Philadelphia and California rolls. They are in my opinion one of the easiest types of rolled sushi to make because they are very forgiving during the rolling process. Making futomaki consists of lining a sheet of nori (dried seaweed) with the a thin layer of the prepared su-meshi (sushi rice), then placing the ingredients in horizontal rows in the approximate center of the rice. The entire package is then rolled away from you with the seam in the nori ending up on the bottom, thus being sealed by the weight of the roll. When you’re new, it can also help to stick the prepared roll in the refrigerator for ten or fifteen minutes to help it solidify, before you cut it into pieces. Thin Rolls Hosomaki, by contrast, contain only a single ingredient and are made using a half sheet of nori, so they are noticeably smaller. There are several types of hosomaki that have different names depending on the filling used: Kappamaki: Cucumber filling, named for a type pf legendary water sprite named the kappa which loves cucumbers. Kappamaki is used to clear the palette in a manner similar to gari (pickled ginger.) Tekkamaki: Raw ahi tuna filling, named for the Tekkaba gambling dens where they originated as a kind of snack food. Tsunamayomaki: Tuna salad, made from canned tuna and mayonnaise. Hosomaki is made in much the same way as futomaki, although it is a bit trickier because there’s less material to work with, so they’re more likely to fall apart. A good suggestion is to use a bit more than a half sheet of nori, so even if you overfill the roll slightly you’ll still have enough material at the edges to make a good seal.…

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Your Guide to Pickled Ginger

Your Guide to Pickled Ginger Pickled ginger is the essential condiment to be eaten with Sushi. It is typically provided with the dish in Sushi restaurants. However, it is very simple to make at home. Pickled ginger is typically used to complement the taste of Sushi and to impart its flavor. The condiment itself is produced from freshly picked ginger of extreme tenderness, known as Shin Shoga. For your information, Ginger is known as Gari in Japanese and anything that is picked is referred to as tsukemono. Pickled ginger is best eaten in between helpings of Sushi. It is known to aid in erasing the flavors of Sushi and its mild taste cleanses the palate ready for the next serving. Here is a recipe for homemade pickled ginger: Remove the peel and cut the fresh ginger into thin slices. The amount of ginger is unimportant, however, two 2 inch pieces are recommended. Ginger should be cut vertically to create slices akin to those seen in Sushi bars. Measure half a teaspoon of salt and sprinkle it onto the ginger slices and put these pieces into a saucepan. Leave to sit for an hour before drying the pieces with a paper towel. Remember to drain off any water that has resulted from the action of salt on water. Take eight ounces of vinegar and add approximately one quarter of a cup of sugar to it. Boil this mixture. Depending upon the required taste, more sugar can be added if you feel that this is necessary. One quarter of a cup of sugar should prove adequate if you want your ginger to taste a little bitter. Add the ginger slices to this mixture and then allow the whole preparation to cool. The color of the pickle will have turned pink over time and this is a good indication that the ginger has pickled.…

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Stocking the Sushi Makers Refrigerator

Stocking the Sushi Makers Refrigerator The well prepared sushi chef, both homemade and professional, will need the perfect complement of cold or frozen items in order to be prepared for his sushi making endeavors. The following ingredients are what are recommended for a well stocked fridge. These two ingredients are must haves in every sushi chefs arsenal, pickled ginger (amuzu shoga) and Wasabi. The pickled ginger is for cleansing the palette between bites and the Wasabi is used to kick it up a notch or enhance the sushi experience. For those of you who haven’t tried Wasabi, tread lightly, this stuff is extremely hot in just the smallest concentration. Diners usually like to mix this with soy sauce and use as a dip for the sushi rolls. These next ingredients are highly recommended to have on hand when you start. You may not need all of them at once, but if you make sushi regularly you will probably want to incorporate them into your menu at some time or other. Deep Fried Tofu Pouches (abura-age) Puffy little pouches that you cut in half and stuff with rice. Similar to pita bread where you stuff ingredients into them and eat with your hand. No chopsticks needed for this dish. Bar-B-Q Unagi (or freshwater eel) Used in several popular rolls, if you don’t have this you can’t make those rolls correctly. Kani Kama (imitation crabmeat) Use a GOOD brand, such as Osaki or Yamasa. These come as little straight rolls and are easier to use when rolling than the real stuff and you can’t hardly tell the difference in taste. Miso (fermented soybean paste) Comes in light and dark colors depending on whether you want a slightly sweet or very salty taste. Can be kept refrigerated for many months. Tofu (soybean curd) Faintly nutty and custard like it come in two textures, soft and creamy or firm and porous. Buy it packed in water and use before the expiration date on the package. This next one you might want to buy as needed, because not everyone will appreciate the experience of eating them. Quail Eggs Served either cooked or poured raw over a roll it is a once in a lifetime experience and not for the faint of heart (or stomach).…

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American Sushi Roll Recipe: Spicy Shrimp Roll With Spicy Crab on Top

American Sushi Roll Recipe: Spicy Shrimp Roll With Spicy Crab on Top I hope you enjoy my recipe for Spicy Shrimp Sushi Roll with Spicy Crab on top. Start off with a 1/2 sheet of Nori (seaweed) and a palm full of sushi prepared rice. With wet hands, press the rice to the edge of the nori (seaweed). You can add as much rice as you like, for my tastes I use a thin layer. Press the rice out to each of the edges, then flip over the seaweed. Now for the spicy shrimp mixture, I use frozen salad shrimp that I get at my local supermarket. Run them under some cold water for 3 or 4 min. to thaw, they are already cooked. Next move the salad shrimp to the cutting board and give them a rough chop. I still like to nice chunks in their so you know you’re eating shrimp, if you like it a bit finer, spend extra time chopping. Then you add one of my favorites, Srirachi hot sauce to taste. I make most of my rolls to medium, guest can always “get crazy” on their own. Make some fresh powdered wasabi to take it to the next level once it’s served. Then add a little teaspoon of mayonnaise to bring it together. The last ingredient is going to be the masago or the little fish eggs. They add a really nice depth of flavor to the spicy shrimp mixture. Next cover the spicy crab mixture with a plastic wrap and making sure to press it down to the top of the food and refrigerate for 15 to 30 min. to set up. Once the spicy shrimp mixture has set up we are ready to add it to the sushi roll. Be careful not to over fill your roll! Next add two beautiful slices of Haas avocados, Haas avocados gives it a rich creamy taste! Now we are ready to roll. Lift up the sushi mat closet to you rolling the filling over with the mat and press it down to compact filling. Roll the sushi over to complete the roll, press down to seal the roll closed. Next is to add the spicy crab to the top of the sushi roll. Spicy crab recipe adds another layer of taste to the American sushi roll. This step takes a little bit of time but worth it at the end. Not only does the presentation look great but what about the taste! You’re looking for a thin layer of spicy crab on top of the sushi roll, I use a small fork and my fingers to get this messy job done. If you don’t have spicy crab you could also use avocado, you could use fish eggs, or even thin slices of fish. That’s the beautiful thing about these American-style sushi rolls you can be very creative with them. When you done putting the thin layer of spicy crab on top of the role next were going to put a piece of plastic wrap over the roll and press it down with your sushi mat to have the spicy crab adhered to the rice. Then I take my wet serrated knife and cut the roll into each eight equal pieces. You start off by cutting the roll in half, then cutting each piece in half and then having those pieces again and the result is eight slices of the sushi roll. I like to plate this on a small square black plate, aligning the sushi pieces on a diagonal with the two end pieces on either side. I hope you enjoy the sushi roll.…

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Sushi – Dry Ingredients You Will Want on Hand When Making Sushi at Home

Sushi – Dry Ingredients You Will Want on Hand When Making Sushi at Home When making sushi at home you need at certain amount of dry ingredients on hand to use in almost all sushi recipes. Unless otherwise noted, you will need to use these items within approximately 6 months and store them in a cool, dry, dark place, such as a pantry or cupboard. The following is a list of some of the more common dry ingredients you will need. The Rice White short or medium grain rice is best. Long grain white rice will not do. It cooks up dry and fluffy, you need your sushi rice to be moist and sticky so it clings together when making your sushi rolls. If possible try to shop in a local asian market or go online to find Japanese short grain rice. Some good brands include Koshihikari and Akita Komachi. Dried kelp (Dashi Konbu) Added to the rice while cooking, it adds a faint sea taste to the rice that is desirable in most finished sushi rolls. It resembles a broad, leathery, wrinkly ribbon. The darker green the better, reddish brown Dashi Konbu is usually old and less tasteful. Dried Bonito Flakes (Katsuobushi) Katsuobushi are shaved flakes of steamed or boiled, smoked and then dried Bonito (Tuna). Used in soups mainly, it needs to be stored in the freezer if not used within a month of first opening. Powdered Green Tea (Matcha) Matcha is used in the Japanese tea ceremony, but when purchased for sushi making it is usually combined with sugar or salt to use as a seasoning in certain recipes. Store opened packages in the freezer. Sheets of Dried Seaweed (Nori) Nori is dried sheets of seaweed used in the making of most of the sushi recipes for rolls. The best tasting Nori is dark green verging on black. Common sizes are 7 inches by 8 inches. It can be cut or broken (depending on how crisp it is) into smaller sizes for use in different sized rolls. Store in a tightly sealed bag in the freezer, then heat it in the oven at 350 degrees for 30 seconds before use. That is some of the more common dry items you will need to make your sushi at home. Check any recipes you are going to use to see if you need any additional ingredients before beginning your sushi making.…